Our Team

Jane Margolis

Senior Researcher, UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies

Jane Margolis is a Senior Researcher at UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies. Since 1994 her work has focused on the underrepresentation of females and students of color in computer science education. Margolis is the lead author of two award-winning books: Unlocking the Clubhouse: Women in Computing (MIT Press, 2002), which examines the gender gap in computer science at the college level; and Stuck in the Shallow End: Education Race, and Computing (MIT Press, 2008), which examines the low number of African-Americans, Latinos, and females in computer science at the high school level. Margolis has helped build a long-lasting partnership with LAUSD, the second largest school district in the country, around broadening participation in computing. She has been the PI on major NSF grants focused on broadening participation in computing and democratizing computer science education, and has served as a national leader on this issue. In 2016, Margolis was awarded as a White House Champion of Change for her work in broadening participation in computing.

Jean Ryoo

Jean Ryoo

Director of Research of the Computer Science Equity Project at UCLA Center X

Jean J. Ryoo, PhD is the Director of Research of the Computer Science Equity Project at UCLA Center X. She is currently leading the “REAL-CS” Project’s effort to understand, from youth perspectives, what students are learning in introductory CS high school courses, and how their experiences with computing impact their engagement, agency, and identity in CS. This research-practice partnership with school districts and classroom teachers has the shared goal of surfacing historically underrepresented students’ voices in the growing “CS for All” movement. Prior to this, she worked with the Tinkering Studio of the San Francisco Exploratorium–a museum of science, art, and human perception–to direct research-practice partnerships focused on equity issues in afterschool STEM making programs (see, for example, the California Tinkering Afterschool Network). Jean builds on her varied experiences as a museum docent, afterschool educator, and public school teacher to inform her focus on using research as a tool to name and counter the inequities that our youth and teachers face in different educational contexts. Jean received her PhD from UCLA, MEdT from University of Hawai’i at Manoa, and her BA from Harvard University.

Julie Flapan

Director, Computer Science Equity Project at UCLA Center X

Dr. Julie Flapan is executive director of the Alliance for California Computing Education for Students and Schools (ACCESS) and the CSforCA project where she advocates for K-12 computer science education in California to ensure its accessibility to all students, especially girls, students of color, and low-income students.  She also serves as director of the Computer Science Project at UCLA’s Center X where she conducts research and works closely with practitioners to inform statewide policy.

Previously, Julie served as Director of Public Engagement for UCLA’s Institute for Democracy, Education and Access (IDEA) where she led the Education Justice Collaborative, integrating research, policy analysis, and coalition building through communications and grassroots organizing strategies to ensure all students have access to a meaningful education that prepares them for college, careers, and democratic participation.

Her research interests include anti-bias/anti-racist education and social justice policies that provide equal opportunities for teaching and learning in low-income communities of color.  Julie has extensive experience facilitating workshops for teachers, parents and community leaders as part of the Anti-Defamation League’s A World of Difference education program.

Julie graduated with a B.A. from Pitzer College, an M.S. in Education and Social Policy from Northwestern University and a doctorate in Educational Leadership from UCLA.  As an advocate for computer science education, her biggest (and admittedly hypocritical) struggle is getting her three children off their devices!

Roxana Hadad

Associate Director, Computer Science Equity Project at UCLA Center X

Roxana Hadad is Associate Director of the Computer Science Equity Project at UCLA Center X. In this role, she is working with the SCALE-CA research-practice partnership to develop professional development and policy that ensures the scalability, equity, and long-term sustainability of computer science education. Previously, she was the Director of Math, Science, and Technology at the Center for College Access and Success (CCAS) at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago. At CCAS, she developed and promoted STEM-focused opportunities for underrepresented Chicago Public School students and was PI on NSF-funded research examining formative assessment for computational thinking and cultural responsiveness in makerspaces. Roxana is a doctoral candidate in Educational Psychology at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and received her master’s degree from the Interactive Telecommunications Project at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University and her bachelor’s degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Because of the opportunities computing has provided Roxana as a Latina and an artist, she is committed to ensuring more students have access to quality computing education.

Cynthia Estrada

Doctoral Student, UCLA Social Science and Comparative Education

Cynthia Estrada is a doctoral student within the Social Science and Comparative Education program at the University of California, Los Angeles. As a first generation college graduate and Chicana, her research interests center around college access and choice for students of underserved populations. She is particularly interested in learning if or how messages of prestige impact college decision making amongst students of color. Prior to UCLA, Cynthia studied at the University of California, Santa Barbara where she received her BA in English with a minor in Applied Psychology and Education.

Tiera Chanté Tanksley

Doctoral Student, UCLA Urban Schooling

Tiera Chantè Tanksley is a doctoral candidate in the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies within UCLA’s Urban Schooling program. Broadly, her research examines the intersectional impacts of race, gender, class and age on the experiences of Black girls in media, technology and education. Grounded in Black feminist thought and critical race theory, her robust research agenda sheds light on the ways Black girls intersect with and are intersected by media and technology systems as they attempt to navigate K-16 educational institutions. Designed in response to #Blacklivesmatter and the growing presence of racialized violence online, Ms. Tanksley’s dissertation study examines the socio-academic consequences of witnessing viral Black death for the Internet’s most vocal and visible users: Black girls and women-becoming. Overall, her scholarship responds to calls for more intersectional analyses of Internet technology that can recognize the lived experiences, modes of resistance and technological contributions of Black girls around the world.

Ms. Tanksley’s professional background includes an MA in Cultural Studies in Education from UCLA and a BS in Elementary Education from Syracuse University. Recently, her contributions to diversity in research were recognized by Yale University and she was inducted into the Edward Bouchet African American Honor Society in April 2017.

Nina Kasuya

Program Manager, Computer Science Equity Project at UCLA Center X

Nina Kasuya is the Program Manager for the Computer Science Equity Project at UCLA Center X. She received her BA in Ethnomusicology with a minor in Music Industry from UCLA. In addition to her work with the Computer Science Equity Project, Nina works as a professional singer and educator. She can be seen performing with HIVE (vocal), Crimes of the Heart Cabaret (theater), and Hamiltease: A Burlesque Parody and Tribute to an American. Nina is currently the director of the musical theater program and a cappella group at Emerson Community Charter School.

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