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  1. Critical literacy and popular culture in urban education: Toward a pedagogy of access and dissent By Ernest Morrell
  2. This won’t be on the final: Reflections on teaching critical media literacy By Rhonda Hammer
  3. The uses of disenchantment in new media pedagogy: Teaching for remediation and reconfiguration By Leah A. Lievrouw
  4. Critical media literacy, democracy, and the reconstruction of education By Douglas Kellner & Jeff Share
  5. Reconstructing technoliteracy: A multiple literacies approach By Richard Kahn & Douglas Kellner
  6. The myth of technology as the ‘great equalizer’ By Jane Margolis
  7. What videogame making can teach us about access and ethics in participatory culture By Yasmin Kafai, William Burke, & Deborah Fields

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Critical literacy and popular culture in urban education: Toward a pedagogy of access and dissent By Ernest Morrell

Author(s): Ernest Morrell

Abstract:

Ernest Morrell, professor of education at UCLA, offers an overview of critical literacy and popular culture beginning with definitions and a framework for a pedagogy of access and dissent. Morrell argues for the need to teach access to academic literacies and also social critique of power relationships. Through case studies with inner-city youth, practical applications illuminate examples of praxis, students learning academic literacies and also becoming ethnographic researchers positioned as activists and advocates for social change.

 

APA Citation:

Morrell, E. (2007). Critical literacy and popular culture in urban education: Toward a pedagogy of access and dissent. In C. Clark & M. Blackburn (Eds.), Working with/in the local: New directions in literacy research for political action (pp. 235-254). New York: Peter Lang Publishing.

Chapter appears with permission of the publisher, Peter Lang Publishing, Inc, New York, © 2007. All rights reserved.

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021CriticalLitPopPP012.pdf — PDF document, 582Kb

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This won’t be on the final: Reflections on teaching critical media literacy By Rhonda Hammer

Author(s): Rhonda Hammer

Abstract:

Long time media literacy educator, Rhonda Hammer, reflects on the development of her ideas and work in media education.  Through an analysis of the current state of education and the need to create critically literate citizens for the 21st century, Hammer frames critical media literacy within a context of radical pedagogy. This chapter provides an in depth description of Hammer’s critical media literacy class that she has taught at UCLA for almost a decade. This class combines critical analysis with alternative media production, thereby providing students the framework to interrogate ideology and the politics of representation with the tools of semiotics and hands on media production. Hammer’s reflections offer a wealth of examples of successes and struggles, for almost anyone interested, to be able to apply her ideas in their own course.

 

APA Citation:

Hammer, R. (2009). This won’t be on the final: Reflections on teaching critical media literacy.  In R. Hammer & D. Kellner (Eds.), Media/cultural studies: Critical approaches (pp. 164-193). New York: Peter Lang Publishing.  

Chapter appears with permission of the publisher, Peter Lang Publishing, Inc, New York, © 2009. All rights reserved.

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022WontFinalPP013.pdf — PDF document, 345Kb

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The uses of disenchantment in new media pedagogy: Teaching for remediation and reconfiguration By Leah A. Lievrouw

Author(s): Leah Lievrouw

Abstract:

Leah Lievrouw, professor of Information Studies at UCLA, explores differences between new media and traditional notions of mass media. She asserts the need for a new media pedagogy that recognizes and embraces the ways in which "reconfiguration" and "remediation" make engagement with new media distinct. New media allow for more possibilities of different types of participation and educators need to use these changes as they attempt to connect students’ experiences with critical thinking and active participation. Lievrouw historically contextualizes two perspectives of the development of media and information communication technology; the more traditional view of mass media as transmitters of content from few to many, a "pipeline" view (involved in gatekeeping and property) vs. a newer view that evolved in the 1990s with more individual participation and interactivity, a "frontier" vision for social relationships and action. Lievrouw also provides examples of different activities she has her university students undertake in order to build their awareness and skills with new media.

 

APA Citation:

Lievrouw, L.A. (2009). The uses of disenchantment in new media pedagogy: Teaching for remediation and reconfiguration. In R. Hammer & D. Kellner (Eds.), Media/cultural studies: Critical approaches (pp. 560-575). New York: Peter Lang Publishing. 

Chapter appears with permission of the publisher, Peter Lang Publishing, Inc, New York, © 2009. All rights reserved.

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023UsesDisenchantPP014.pdf — PDF document, 395Kb

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Critical media literacy, democracy, and the reconstruction of education By Douglas Kellner & Jeff Share

Author(s): Douglas Kellner & Jeff Share

Abstract:

This chapter explores the theoretical underpinnings of critical media literacy and analyzes four different approaches to teaching it. Combining cultural studies with critical pedagogy, Douglas Kellner and Jeff Share argue that critical media literacy aims to expand the notion of literacy to include different forms of media culture, information and communication technologies and new media, as well as deepen the potential of literacy education to critically analyze relationships between media and audiences, information and power. A multiperspectival approach addressing issues of gender, race, class and power is used to explore the interconnections of media literacy, cultural studies and critical pedagogy. In the interest of a vibrant participatory democracy, educators need to move the discourse beyond the stage of debating whether or not critical media literacy should be taught, and instead focus energy and resources on exploring the best ways for implementing it.

 

APA CItation:

Kellner, D., & Share, J. (2007). Critical media literacy, democracy, and the reconstruction of education. In D. Macedo & S.R. Steinberg (Eds.), Media literacy: A reader (pp. 3-23).  New York:  Peter Lang Publishing.

Chapter appears with permission of the publisher, Peter Lang Publishing, Inc, New York, © 2007. All rights reserved.

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024CritLitDemocracyPP015.pdf — PDF document, 386Kb

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Reconstructing technoliteracy: A multiple literacies approach By Richard Kahn & Douglas Kellner

Author(s): Richard Kahn & Douglas Kellner

Abstract:

Much has been written that describes the history of the concept of “technological literacy” and, more recently, a literature attempting to chart emancipatory technoliteracies has emerged over the last decade. This article begins with a brief examination of the meanings that “technology” and “literacy” have received towards achieving insight into what sort of knowledge and skills “technoliteracy” hails. Richard Kahn and Douglas Kellner then summarize the broad trajectories of development in hegemonic programs of contemporary technoliteracy from their arguable origins as “computer literacy” in the A Nation at Risk report of 1983 up to the present call for integration of technology across the curriculum and the standards-based approach of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and 2004’s US National Educational Technology Plan. In contradistinction, they reveal how this approach has been tacitly challenged at the global institutional level through the United Nations’ Project 2000+, and theorize how this might link up with a democratic project of re-visioning education though multiple literacies. Finally, in closing, Kahn and Kellner think about what it will mean to reconstruct “technoliteracy” broadly in this manner and conclude with a call for new critical pedagogies that can inform and be informed by the counterhegemonic idea of “multiple technoliteracies”.

 

APA Citation:

Kahn, R., & Kellner, D. (2005). Reconstructing technoliteracy: A multiple literacies approach.  E-Learning 2(3), 238-251

Chapter appears with the permission of the publisher, E-Learning, New York, © 2005. All rights reserved.

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025ReconstructTechnoPP016.pdf — PDF document, 494Kb

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The myth of technology as the ‘great equalizer’ By Jane Margolis

Author(s): Jane Margolis

Abstract:

The number of African Americans and Latino/as receiving undergraduate and advanced degrees in computer science is disproportionately low, according to recent surveys. And relatively few African American and Latino/a high school students receive the kind of institutional encouragement, educational opportunities, and preparation needed for them to choose computer science as a field of study and profession. In Stuck in the Shallow End, Jane Margolis looks at the daily experiences of students and teachers in three Los Angeles public high schools: an overcrowded urban high school, a math and science magnet school, and a well-funded school in an affluent neighborhood. She finds an insidious "virtual segregation" that maintains inequality. In the introduction to this book, Margolis reviews the current state of computer science, shares statistics that reveal the depth of the racial and ethnic divide in the field, and introduces the book’s themes and findings.

APA Citation:

Margolis, J. (2008). Introduction: The myth of technology as the ‘great equalizer’. In Stuck in the shallow end: Education, race, and computing (pp. 1-16). Cambridge: Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Chapter appears with the permission of the publisher, MIT Press, Cambridge, © 2008. All rights reserved.

 

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026MythOfTechPP017.pdf — PDF document, 262Kb

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What videogame making can teach us about access and ethics in participatory culture By Yasmin Kafai, William Burke, & Deborah Fields

Author(s): Yasmin Kafai, William Burke, & Deborah Fields

Abstract:

Yasmin Kafai, William Burke, and Deborah Fields write about ethical challenges for students and educators being brought about by new technologies and uses of new media. They report on their work with youth (10-12 years) involved in videogame making, a growing field that challenges youth to no longer simply participate as consumers of technology but as producers as well. They examine contentious issues of participation, appropriation, networking, cheating, and crediting the source. Gee’s (2003) notion of video games as “learning environments” suggests that the boundaries between school and games are not as sharply divided as previously supposed, and the widespread presence of game-making technologies in and around schools further calls into ethical consideration exactly how youth receive and produce information. The authors of this paper suggest that schools’ traditional notions of plagiarism need to be reconsidered as both schools and digital games would do well to study each other’s divergent conceptions of cheating.

 

APA Citation:

Kafai, Y.B., Burke, William, & Fields, D.A. (submitted). What videogame making can teach us about access and ethics in participatory culture. Submitted to the Digital Games Research Association (DIGRA 2009), London, United Kingdom.

Paper appears with permission from the authors, © 2009 Authors & Digital Games Research Association (DIGRA). All rights reserved.

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027VideogameMakingPP018.pdf — PDF document, 337Kb

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