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Teachers Workroom

  1. Five ways to grow as a digital writing teacher
  2. Five key questions that can change the world: Classroom activities for media literacy
  3. Teaching democracy: A media literacy approach
  4. Antero Garcia’s high school podcasting curriculum and student MP3s
  5. UCLA History and Geography Project: Geographic Literacy online lesson

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Five ways to grow as a digital writing teacher

Author(s): Richard Beach, Chris Anson, Lee-Ann Kastman Breuch, & Thom Swiss

Abstract:

In this final chapter from the book, Teaching Writing Using Blogs, Wikis, and other Digital Tools, the authors suggest five practical strategies for educators to improve their abilities to teach writing with digital tools. The suggestions are also supported by numerous online links, articles and resources. Richard Beach, one of the book’s authors, has written several books on media literacy and teaches courses on media literacy at the University of Madison full-time and part-time at UCLA. This book is accompanied by a wiki page  that provides many useful resources.

 

APA Citation:

Beach, R., Anson, C., Kastman Breuch, L., & Swiss, T. (2008). Five ways to grow as a digital writing teacher. In Teaching writing using blogs, wikis, and other digital tools (pp. 219-226). Norwood, MA: Christopher-Gordon Publishers.

Chapter appears with the permission of the publisher, Christorpher-Gordon Publishers, Inc., Norwood, MA, © 2008. All rights reserved.

Attachment
029FiveWaysGrowPP020.pdf — PDF document, 238Kb

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Five key questions that can change the world: Classroom activities for media literacy

Author(s): Jeff Share, Elizabeth Thoman & Tessa Jolls

Abstract:

Five Key Questions That Can Change the World is a collection of 25 lesson plans - five for each of the Center for Media Literacy’s Five Key Questions. These lessons provide activities to help teachers begin teaching core concepts of media literacy to students of all ages. The lessons are available in English, Spanish and Turkish -- a free sample is available via the Center for Media Literacy. The main author of these lesson plans is now a faculty advisor in the Teacher Education Program at UCLA.

APA Citation:

Share, J. , Thoman, E. & Jolls, T. (2005). Five key questions that can change the world: Classroom activities for media literacy. Los Angeles: Center for Media Literacy. Online for free download at:

Link: http://www.medialit.org/five-key-questions-can-change-world

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Teaching democracy: A media literacy approach

Author(s): Jeff Share & Elizabeth Thoman

Abstract:

Jeff Share and Elizabeth Thoman wrote Teaching Democracy: A Media Literacy Approach as an educator’s guide to help teachers develop and implement student media production that is critical and empowering. This guide explores relationships between media and democracy in American society and provides approaches for media analysis and production of youth-generated media in both traditional classroom settings and in alternative learning environments nationwide. This guide is available for free download online at the National Center for the Preservation of Democracy.

 

APA Citation:

Share, J. & Thoman, E. (2007). Teaching democracy: A media literacy approach. Los Angeles: The National Center for the Preservation of Democracy. Online for free download at:

Link: http://www.ncdemocracy.org/sites/www.ncdemocracy.org/files/docs/D+Dweb_educators_guide.pdf

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Antero Garcia’s high school podcasting curriculum and student MP3s

Author(s): Antero Garcia

Abstract:

Over the course of seven weeks, twelfth grade students read novels in literary circles that situated individual struggle within a global context. The novels chosen - Invisible Man, What is the What, Persepolis, In the Time of the Butterflies, and Don Quixote - represented different genres, perspectives, and levels of reading for my differentiated classroom. Using these texts for students to research and present in groups about struggles from a global and historical perspective, students then conducted interviews with parents and community members about their own experiences of struggle. Encouraged to build connections between a Salvadoran parent's experiences and those described in a Sudanese memoir or the Iranian struggle from the eyes of a young girl, the class explored universal themes of individual resiliency and agency. The culminating activity of this unit asked students to document their own experiences of struggle and locate these experiences within a global perspective. Utilizing radio documentary strategies, students developed audio autoethnographies from narrated passages, interviews, reenactments, and music. The final products were self-edited and published for public dissemination.

Two MP3 Student Samples

1. The Inequality of Education
2. My Journey from Guatemala

Antero is a PhD student and Manual Arts High School teacher.

Attachment
030HighSchoolPodCastIP010.pdf — PDF document, 795Kb

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UCLA History and Geography Project: Geographic Literacy online lesson

Author(s): Norma Mota-Altman

Abstract:

This is one lesson in a series called Geographic Literacy, which is a collaborative project between The Automobile Club of Southern California and the UCLA History-Geography Project. This lesson, “Visual Literacy: Making comparisons in Our Neighborhoods: Then and Now in Alhambra and the San Gabriel Valley” is intended for students in grades 9-12 ESL and Sheltered Social Studies. It involves the students in exploring their own community to photograph locations near their school and then compare their images to historic photographs of the same spots. It also has a nice activity in which students create poems about the photos past and present.

Link: http://geographicliteracy.gseis.ucla.edu/high/motaaltman.html

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